Freetronics: Arduino-Compatible Electronics Kits & Parts

Here at Freetronics we design, sell and support our range of flexible, easy to use boards and modules, making it easy for you to build your own electronic projects.

What Is Arduino? Arduino is a very popular and easy to use programmable board for creating your own projects. Consisting of a simple hardware platform and a free source code editor with an easy “one-click compile/upload” feature, it’s designed to be really easy to use without being an expert programmer. Arduino is also the most popular microcontroller board for advanced users and all kinds of more ambitious projects.... Read more

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Arduino Kits Online

Looking for an Arduino kit online then you have come to the right place. We design, sell and supply electronic components which are arduino components.
For Arduino kits in Melbourne then always go for Freetronics.

Arduino parts online

If you need Arduino parts online our store has a wide range of kits and parts. Arduino melbourne, arduino uno, arduino duemilanove usb

Arduino duemilanove

We have lots of Arduino electronic components like ethernet shield, arduino mega usb and buy usbdroid

Microcontroller Boards

We sell a huge range of microcontroller boards which will be compatible with adruino electronic components

News

September 03, 2015

Create text on your oscilloscope using an Arduino

If you're looking for something different to do with your oscilloscope then some fun can be had by creating vector images and text on the display. This can be done quite easily using an Arduino with a small amount of external circuitry, and is described by Instructables user MadEncoder.

The process is simple, and involves feeding a pair of PWM (Pulse-Width Modulation) signals each through a low-pass filter then to a channel of the oscillscope, set to X-Y mode. The low-pass filters alter the PWM signals in a way that allow them to rise and fall and appear as vectors on the display - and thus creating the required image, for example:

Certainly something different, and you can start to find out more from the project's Instructable page. And for more, we're on facebookGoogle+, and twitter - so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

If you need to add external hardware or devices to your next Arduino project, such as the circuit described above - you'll need a protoshield to mount the external circuitry. When doing so, consider our range of ProtoShields. From the tiny LeoStick to the Mega we have a wide range to suit your application.

September 01, 2015

Make a desktop CNC plotter with Arduino

Have you ever seen a plotter or CNC (Computer-Numerical Control) machine and thought "wow, I'd like one of those"? Well now you can make your own based around an Arduino or compatible hardware and the notes by Instructables member ardumotive.

They describe a desktop CNC plotter that not only introduces you the theory and control of a CNC device - the results are the neat unit shown in the video below.

Apart from the hardware and Arduino sketches, you are also introduced to converting images into the required instructions in order to have them created by the plotter - a complete package.

To get started with your own version, visit the project's Instructable page. And for more, we're on facebookGoogle+, and twitter - so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're looking to develop projects based on an Arduino that use stepper motor, CNC machines on a larger scale, and much more - simplify the process with our Freetronics StepDuino board:

The StepDuino is a complete, self-contained Arduino-compatible board with 2 onboard stepper motor drivers, 2 servo outputs, a 20x4 LCD, a micro SD card slot, and more! It's a fantastic general purpose board for any project that uses stepper motors. You can use it as the brain of your next robotics project!

The StepDuino uses the same processor architecture as the common Arduino Uno, so you can program it right from the Arduino IDE simply by selecting "Arduino Uno" as the board type. Everything simply works out of the box, just as it would with a regular Arduino - but now you can also drive steppers directly and display feedback on the huge LCD. For more infromation, tutorials and to order - visit the StepDuino page.

 

August 31, 2015

Build your own huge stepper motor with Arduino

Have you ever wondered how a stepper motor worked? Like most things if you work through making it yourself, all your questions can be answered and more. With this in mind Instructables user ProtoG did just that and has documented their home-made stepper motor made from 3D-printed parts.

The motor is capable of 15 degree full steps, or 7.5 degree half steps in either direction, and is controlled via an Arduino or compatible board. Each coil can be controlled via an N-MOSFET which allows for easy Arduino connection - the MOSFETs can be neatly activated by a digital output pin. For a demonstration of the stepper motor, watch the following video:

To make your own, all the design files and information can be found on the motor's Instructable page. And for more, we're on facebook, twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're looking into starting with Arduino and robotics, such as controlling a stepper motor (or DC motors) from your Arduino or compatible, check out our HBRIDGE: DC/stepper motor shield.

Based around the powerful Allegro A4954 H-bridge driver IC you can control two DC motors with complete ease, or one bipolar stepper motor. With connections for external power management, a complete beginners' guide and documentation - motor control couldn't be any easier. For more information and to order, visit the HBRIDGE: page.

August 27, 2015

Make a wireless parking assistant with Arduino

Parking cars in garages can always be a challenge when you're in a hurry, or if your new car or garage is just a bit too tight. This problem can be solved with Arduino and some spare time, and is demonstrated by Instructables member saiyam.

They created a device based around an Arduino circuit and an ultrasonic distance sensor, which measures the distance between the vehicle and the wall, and sends the data back to a receiver unit via a 433 MHz wireless data link. The receiver is a portable model kept inside the vehicle, which emits a tone relative to the distance available - keeping you accident free and also learning more about Arduino.

Apart from helping avoid a small accident, this is a fun project that's inexpensive and easy to build, so to get started visit the project's Instructable page. And for more, we're on facebook, twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're looking to work with your own RF wireless hardware, but don't want to make your own receiver circuit - check out our range of  315/433 MHz receiver shields:

Apart from being idea for working with the various low-cost data links on the market, the shield can also be used to capture wireless weather station data, as described in the book "Practical Arduino". For more information and ideas, check out the product page.

August 24, 2015

Build a classic Star Trek Wall Comm with Arduino

Fans of the original "Star Trek" can now recreate the wall communicator units as used on the Enterprise in a short period of time thanks to Instructables member FredO2 - whose wall comm replacement is made with an Arduino, some hacked walkie-talkies and some 3D-printed enclosure parts.

The new system allows for sending the various boatswain signals and for the recipient to reply via radio in the classic fashion. Furthermore an alert and siren/klaxon can be sounded at the press of a button. All very good fun and ideal for amateur theatre, a different form of intercom or just for fun.

For complete details including design files and code - visit the project's Instructable page. And for more, we're on twitter, facebook and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you have heard about the Arduino development platform and wanted to learn more -  you can't go past reading a copy of "Arduino Workshop -  A Hands-On Introduction with 65 Projects” by John Boxall.

Arduino Workshop takes the reader from having zero knowledge about the Arduino platform, electronics and programming and leaves them with the know-how and instructions on everything from blinking an LED, to robotics, wireless data, cellular communications, motor control, sensors, Internet connected systems and more. For more information including a sample chapter and table of contents, visit the book page.

August 21, 2015

Detect Electromagnetic Interference with Arduino

You can make a wide varierty of test equipment with an Arduino, and some more accurate than others. However you can still find success towards the simpler end of the spectrum, and one example of this is by Instructables member JohnE12 and their electromagnetic interference detector.

This is based around an Arduino board with a long wire feeding into an analogue input. This can pick up all sorts of EMI and other signals - the strength of which is measured by the analogue to digital converter and the strength value approximated using a series of LEDs. The user then can easily walk around the area and determine the strength of EMI and thus possibly the source.

Although simple, this is a useful and also a fun tool to share with beginners as an exampel of using an analogue input. To learn more about this project, visit the Instructable page. And for more, we're on facebookGoogle+, and twitter - so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you need to add external hardware or devices to your next Arduino project, you'll need a protoshield to mount the external circuitry. In doing so, consider our range of ProtoShields. From the tiny LeoStick to the Mega we have a wide range to suit your application.

August 18, 2015

Build your own Arduino-powered Fireworks Controller

An interesting example of what is possible with the Arduino development platform has been described by Instructables member Jonathan Bush whose fireworks controller system is quite simple in design yet effective in operation. 

Based around an Arduino Mega board, the controller includes a solid user interface panel and can trigger relays which send current to the electronic matches with the fireworks. Although fireworks aren't available to the public in most areas, this still shows what can be done or perhaps motivate your own control panel project. A quick demonstration is shown in the following video:

For more information and some interesting discussions about this control module, visit the Instructable page. And for more, we're on facebooktwitter and Google+ - so follow us for news and product updates as well.

When working on your own projects based on an Arduino Mega or EtherMega that require external circuitry or wiring - and you're not up for making a PCB - consider using a Freetronics Protoshield Mega. It includes the male header pins and a reset button to fit, and is also a little shorter to allow space for the RJ45 socket on an EtherMega. For more information and to order, visit the product page

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